EMI Standards and Best Practices

Chapter 8 – Special Handling Considerations

Purpose: All evidence, regardless of type, should be handled in a manner that preserves the item and ensures a seamless, unbroken, secure chain of custody. However, multiple evidence types common to evidence management operations require special handling to ensure the integrity of the evidence system. The Evidence Management Institute recommends special handling considerations for evidence types that fall into one or more of the following categories: high-liability evidence, high-value evidence, forensic-value evidence, hazardous evidence; or evidence that requires specific storage or preservation conditions.  Many of the evidence types described in this chapter can fall into multiple categories listed above depending on the nature of the case or item. This chapter specifically addresses firearms, narcotics, currency and biological evidence handling and generally addresses handling considerations for other item types not listed. Implementation and adoption of the Special Handling Considerations standards and practices recommended by the Evidence Management Institute promotes a stable organizational baseline for sustainable evidence management.

 

Scope: Biological Evidence Standards and Best Practices

Firearms Evidence Standards and Best Practices

Currency Evidence Standards and Best Practices

Narcotics and Drug evidence Standards and Best Practices

High-Value Evidence Standards and Best Practices

 

Definitions: Biological Evidence. Refers to evidence items that contain biological source material. Common forms of biological source material include blood, hair, tissue or other trace forms of evidence containing DNA evidence.

SANE Kit. Specific term and acronym for Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner kit, refers to any sexual assault evidence collected from a forensic examination of a victim of sexual assault. Other jurisdictions may use similar or alternative nomenclature for the sexual assault forensic examination kit. It is important to note and distinguish that sexual assault investigations may include multiple forensic or biological evidence items in addition to a forensic medical examination kit.

Firearms Evidence. Refers to evidence items meeting the legal and accepted definition of a firearm,  antique firearm or ammunition as described in Title 18 USC Chapter 44 §921.

Currency Evidence. Refers to evidence items intended to function as a medium of exchange, traditionally paper bills, coinage or bonds issued by a government. May also be extended to include financial instruments or electronic data used as a medium of exchange.

Narcotics and Drug evidence. Refers to evidence items containing illicit or substances, precursor substances, plants or chemicals as defined by statute.

High-Liability Evidence. Refers to evidence types that are susceptible to theft, misuse or misappropriation due to the item’s value or utility, commonly includes currency, narcotics and firearms evidence or other high-value evidence items stored by the unit. Also includes items that carry significant value as probative forensic evidence that could impugn the integrity of the agency and the case if mishandled.

High-Value Evidence. Refers to items with a high replacement value, as defined by the agency.  

Forensic-Value Evidence. Refers to items containing direct probative or forensic value capable of identifying an individual, or providing a link between an individual and a specific event, place or time.

Hazardous Evidence. Refers to evidence items that carry exposure risks or inherent physical properties, or specific storage requirements that could cause harm to a person or property if handled improperly. Commonly includes items containing volatile or toxic chemicals, strong base or acidic chemicals or oxidizers, explosive substances, pathogenic biological substances or other harmful materials.

Chapter VIII. Special Handling Considerations

    1. Biological Evidence Standards
      1. Biological Evidence Principles
        1. Biological evidence; due to its unique evidentiary value, forensic value, specific storage and preservation requirements, and the potential health risks associated with handling of biological evidence, requires special handling considerations for associated evidence types.
        2. The 2013 National Institute of Standards and Technology publication The Biological Evidence Preservation Handbook: Best Practices for Evidence Handlers should be used for primary guidance related to the management and preservation of biological evidence.
        3. All agencies collecting forensic medical examination evidence, commonly referred to as a SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) kit, should require the submission and forensic analysis of all collected SANE kit, or sexual assault forensic medical examination evidence.
      2. Biological Evidence Packaging and Labeling
        1. Biological evidence items should be packaged using materials that are forensically appropriate for preserving and storing the type of evidence submitted.
        2. Biological evidence packaging should conform to forensic lab requirements for evidence submission.
        3. Items containing biological evidence should be clearly labeled and marked as biological evidence with a distinct biohazard label and symbol.
        4. Items containing biological evidence should be packaged and sealed individually to prevent cross contamination.
        5. Wet evidence containing biological materials should be dried prior to packaging.
      3. Biological Evidence Submission and Intake
        1. Agencies should provide appropriate and secure temporary storage for submitted evidence pending acceptance by the evidence management unit.

 

  • Appropriate temporary storage conditions vary depending on the biological evidence type submitted, most biological evidence should be stored under temperature controlled, refrigerated or frozen storage conditions as defined in the 2013 National Institute of Standards and Technology publication The Biological Evidence Preservation Handbook: Best Practices for Evidence Handlers.

 

        1. Temporary secure storage should prevent cross contamination of evidence and prevent unauthorized access to submitted evidence.
    1. Biological Evidence Documentation
      1. Evidence reports or records should clearly indicate items or item types which contain biological evidence.
      2. Biological evidence collected by personnel outside the agency, most commonly by sexual assault nurse examiners or outside forensic investigators, should document all identification and chain of custody information related to the evidence item.
    2. Biological Evidence Storage
      1. Biological evidence items should be stored under environmental conditions suitable for the preservation of biological evidence.
        1. Appropriate storage conditions vary depending on the biological evidence type submitted, most biological evidence should be stored under temperature controlled, refrigerated or frozen storage conditions as defined in the 2013 National Institute of Standards and Technology publication The Biological Evidence Preservation Handbook: Best Practices for Evidence Handlers.
    3. Biological Evidence Disposition
      1. Biological evidence authorized and approved for disposition should be destroyed in a manner that complies with statutes and regulations that govern medical or biological waste disposal or destruction.
      2. If in conflict, statutes requiring the long term retention of biological evidence should supercede local disposition eligibility requirements.
  1. Biological Evidence Best Practices
    1. SANE Analysis Reporting
      1. Many states have enacted legislation requiring agencies to provide sexual assault victims with information related to the status of analysis of SANE kits. Regardless of statutory requirements, agencies are recommended to provide victims of sexual assault with information related to the status of analysis of collected forensic medical examination kits. Information provided to victims should not include information that could jeopardize active investigation or identification of offenders.
    2. Biological Evidence Disposal
      1. Incineration by an approved disposal facility is a common process for destroying biological evidence.
      2. Partnering with local medical facilities may provide a local alternative to transporting biological evidence to a remote disposal location.
  1. Firearms Evidence Standards
    1. Firearms Evidence Principles
      1. Firearms evidence requires special handling considerations for associated evidence types due to inherent constitutional and statutory requirements, agency integrity implications, evidentiary value, potential forensic value, potential safety risks, and the potential for theft or misappropriation.
      2. Evidence management unit personnel should receive documented firearms training related to:
        1. Safe handling of firearms
        2. Identification of firearm make, model, caliber, finish and serial number
        3. Visual confirmation of visibly safe unloaded firearm condition
    2. Firearms Evidence Packaging and Labeling
      1. Safe firearms packaging requires an exception to the general principle of packaging, sealing and labeling evidence. Firearms evidence packages may be submitted unsealed if approved and documented in the agency packaging manual.
      2. Firearms should be submitted in visibly safe, unloaded condition. Any exceptions made to this standard should require additional documented procedures to ensure safe storage.
      3. Firearms should be packaged or stored in a manner that prevents cross contamination and oxidation, packaging firearms evidence in sealed plastic packaging should be avoided.
      4. Firearms should be packaged or stored in a manner the prevents damage or alteration to the firing pin, muzzle, barrel interior or other component used for forensic analysis or comparison.
    3. Firearms Evidence Submission and Intake
      1. Firearms should be submitted unloaded and made visibly safe prior to submission by the officer.
      2. Firearm serial numbers should be run through NCIC or applicable state crime information network to determine whether the submitted item has been reported stolen.
      3. Firearm serial numbers should be visually verified for accuracy by evidence management unit personnel prior to storage.
    4. Firearms Evidence Documentation
      1. Firearms evidence documentation should include accurate and complete information, including:
        1. Make
        2. Model
        3. Firearm Type or Category
        4. Caliber
        5. Barrel size
        6. Serial Number
        7. Attached devices
        8. Unique markings or identifiers
        9. NCIC Stolen Item history
      2. Controlled field lists for firearms descriptions provide the most consistent information for reporting and accurate database information.
    5. Firearms Evidence Storage
      1. Firearms evidence should be stored in a separate storage area from general evidence storage under increased security.
      2. Firearms evidence should be stored in a temperature controlled environment to prevent rust or damage to the item.
    6. Firearms Evidence Disposition
      1. Multiple options exist for disposition of firearms, agencies that elect to destroy firearms as a disposition option should ensure that firearms are destroyed that meets the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms standard for firearms destruction:
        1. Acceptable method of destruction is to completely melt (smelt), shred or crush the firearm receiver.  These torch cuts are acceptable alternatives to shredding.
          1. Must pass through the forward wall or barrel mounting area
          2. Must pass through the rear wall
          3. Must pass through an area having a critical fire-control-component mounting pin and/or the slot in which the operating handle reciprocates
        2. An unserviceable firearm is not destroyed and is still regulated as a “firearm” under Federal law. Any method of destruction must render the firearm so that it is not restorable to firing condition and is otherwise reduced to scrap.
      2. Firearms evidence eligible for disposition should be stored separately from active firearms evidence under increased security.
      3. Disposition processes related to firearms disposition should involve two persons to witness and verify disposition.
      4. Evidence should not be marked as destroyed or disposed prior to confirmation and documentation actual destruction or final disposition.
      5. Accurate disposal records indicating the specific item, associated documentation of authorization and approval for disposal, disposal mechanism, dates of disposal, person or entity disposing of the item, and disposition witness information should be maintained permanently by the evidence management unit.
  1. Firearms Evidence Best Practices
    1. Disposition Considerations
      1. Some jurisdictions require the auction of disposed firearms. Agencies electing to auction firearms or otherwise return firearm evidence to public circulation should be prepared to respond if auctioned or sold firearms items are used in subsequent criminal offenses.
      2. Some forensic ballistic firearms labs will accept disposed firearm donations for future ballistic comparison or analysis.
      3. Some vendors may provide secure destruction services for disposed firearms at no cost to the agency.
  2. Currency Evidence Standards
    1. Currency Evidence Principles
      1. Currency evidence; due to inherent constitutional or property rights implications, agency integrity implications, evidentiary value, potential forensic value, and the potential for theft or misappropriation requires special handling considerations for associated evidence types.
      2. Seizure or collection of currency evidence should be treated with the utmost regard to statutory and constitutional compliance. Agencies should authorize specific conditions for currency evidence collection and submission. Generally, currency evidence submission is acceptable:
        1. When seized as forfeiture property under state or federal statutes in connection to eligible criminal activity, and accompanied by seizure documentation filed with the appropriate court
        2. When currency or coinage is known or believed to be stolen
        3. When currency or coinage is known or believed to possess forensic value
        4. When found or abandoned as non-evidentiary property
        5. For safekeeping as non-evidentiary property on behalf of, and to be returned to, a known owner.
      3. Currency evidence should be classified by the submitting officer into two categories:
        1. Forensic currency evidence.
          1. Currency or coinage items known or believed to contain, or have been requested for examination or testing for, trace evidence such as latent print, chemical or DNA evidence.
          2. Currency known or believed to link any associated subject or activity by virtue of the specific identifier such as a bill serial number.
          3. Currency with a value higher than the denomination value marked on the bill or coin, such as antique coins, uncirculated bills or coin, or currency items containing other ascribed value unrelated to the denomination value marked on the bill or coin.
        2. Non-forensic currency evidence.
          1. Bills or coinage in current circulation not believed or known to possess forensic value in addition to the bill or coin denomination value.
    2. Currency Evidence Packaging and Labeling
      1. Currency or coinage should not be packaged in combination or mixed with any other item types.
      2. Currency evidence item labels should indicate the total amount of currency or coinage submitted.
      3. Currency evidence item labels should indicate the name and identification number of the submitting officer and the name and identification number of the person who verified the count of currency or coinage submitted.
      4. Currency evidence items should be sealed to detect unauthorized opening, tampering or removal of evidence.
      5. Specific instruction for packaging, labeling and sealing currency evidence should be provided in the packaging manual published and distributed by the evidence management unit.
    3. Currency Evidence Submission and Intake
      1. Currency submitted to the evidence management unit should be accurately counted by denomination and verified by a second identified person prior to submission.
        1. An exception to the two-person verification standard exists for agencies who have established policy implementing alternative protocols and procedures modeled by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration for seized currency.
      2. Currency submitted to the evidence management unit should be subject to inspection and verification by evidence management personnel.
      3. Inspection and verification by evidence management personnel should follow the same two-person verification requirement for evidence submission.
    4. Currency Evidence Documentation
      1. Currency evidence submitted to the evidence management unit should be accurately documented with respect to total amount submitted.
      2. Documentation of currency evidence should contain information identifying the person from whom the currency was seized or collected owner of submitted currency evidence, if other than the person from whom the currency was seized or collected.
      3. Documentation of authorization and movement of all currency evidence should be documented in the chain of custody.
    5. Currency Evidence Storage
      1. Currency evidence should be stored in a separate storage area from general evidence storage under increased security.
    6. Currency Evidence Disposition
      1. Options for disposition of currency evidence include:
        1. Return to owner after the expiration of the required duration of custody and receipt of authorization and approval for disposition
        2. Conversion and deposit to state or local accounts upon final award by court order
        3. Other measures required or stipulated by court order or statute
      2. Currency evidence eligible for disposition should be stored separately from active currency evidence under increased security.
      3. Disposition processes related to currency disposition should involve two persons to witness and verify disposition.
      4. Evidence should not be marked as disposed prior to confirmation and documentation actual destruction or final disposition.
      5. Accurate disposal records; indicating the specific item, associated documentation of authorization and approval for disposal, disposal mechanism, dates of disposal, person or entity disposing of the item, and disposition witness information should be maintained permanently by the evidence management unit.
    7. Currency Deposit
      1. Deposit of non-forensic currency evidence should be subject to documented procedures established by the agency in compliance with local regulations and state and federal statutes.
      2. Forensic currency evidence should not be deposited and should remain in the secure storage area of the evidence management unit until movement or disposition authorization and approval is obtained and documented.
  1. Currency Evidence Best  Practices
    1. Currency Submission Verification
      1. If two-person person verification of currency submission is not possible given agency resources, or if an agency elects to provide additional security measures for the submission of currency, the following options should be considered:
        1. The use of an automated currency counter.
        2. The use of additional video surveillance in currency packaging areas.
    2. Deposit of Non-Forensic Currency
      1. Deposit of non-forensic currency in a financial institution is the recommended method of storage for non-forensic currency.
      2. Deposits should be tracked by account and amount to ensure return to the owner or for future award of ownership.
      3. Deposited currency should be considered in the custody of the agency until finally disposed and distributed.
    3. Counterfeit Currency or Coinage
      1. Counterfeit currency or coinage should be sent to United States Secret Service for review, analysis and verification of counterfeit status.
      2. Items submitted to the United States Secret Service as counterfeit but determined to be authentic currency will be returned to the evidence management unit.
    4. Documentation of Receipt from Owner
      1. When currency is collected as evidence, whether under search warrant or other method, it is a recommended practice to provide a receipt of collection that provides information on due process for the return of the item.
    5. Foreign Currency
      1. Foreign currency should generally be treated as forensic currency due to the fact that most financial institutions cannot return the original face value of foreign currency indexed to the exchange rate available on the date of submission.
    6. Destroyed Currency
      1. Destroyed currency may be sent to the United States Department of Treasury for reclamation. Treasury Department analysts will replace damaged or destroyed bills and return the currency to the sender.
  1. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Standards
    1. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Principles
      1. Narcotics and drug evidence requires special handling considerations for associated evidence types due to its evidentiary value, forensic value, potential resale value, the potential for misuse or abuse, and the potential health risks associated with handling of narcotics and drug evidence.
      2. Narcotics and drug evidence includes any evidence items containing illicit substances, precursor substances, plants or chemicals as defined by statute.
    2. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Packaging and Labeling
      1. Narcotics and drug evidence items should be packaged using materials that are forensically appropriate for preserving and storing the type of evidence submitted.
      2. Narcotics and drug evidence packaging should conform to forensic lab requirements for evidence submission.
      3. Items containing narcotics or drug evidence should be clearly labeled, identifying the type, quantity or weight of narcotics or drug evidence submitted.
      4. Items containing narcotics or drug evidence should be packaged and sealed individually to prevent cross contamination. Multiple drug types or pill types associated with a criminal case or cases should not be packaged in the same package.
      5. Wet evidence, such as plants containing narcotics or drug materials should be dried prior to packaging.
    3. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Submission and Intake
      1. Narcotics or drug evidence submitted to the evidence management unit should identify the type, quantity and weight of the item submitted.
      2. Narcotics or drug evidence requiring further forensic analysis should be accompanied by a request for forensic lab analysis as established by agency and forensic lab policy.
      3. Narcotics or drug evidence item documentation accuracy should be verified by evidence management unit personnel prior to acceptance, storage or further processing.
      4. Narcotics or drug evidence submitted to the evidence management unit should be subject to inspection and verification by evidence management personnel.
      5. Packages submitted with inconsistent documentation should be inspected prior to acceptance.
    4. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Documentation
      1. Narcotics and drug evidence documentation should include accurate and complete information, including:
        1. Drug Type
        2. Quantity
        3. Unpackaged Weight
        4. Packaged Weight
      2. Controlled field lists for narcotics and drug evidence descriptions provide the most consistent information for reporting and accurate database information.
      3. Documentation of authorization and movement of all narcotics and drug evidence should be documented in the chain of custody.
    5. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Storage
      1. Narcotics and drug evidence should be stored in a separate storage area from general evidence storage under increased security.
      2. Narcotics and drug storage areas should provide appropriate environmental conditions and adequate ventilation to preserve evidence and reduce exposure risks associated with narcotics and drug storage.
    6. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Disposition
      1. Narcotics and drug evidence eligible, authorized and approved for disposition should be destroyed in compliance with state and federal regulations. Incineration at an approved disposal facility is the most common method for narcotics and drug evidence disposal
      2. Narcotics and drug evidence eligible for disposition should be stored separately from active narcotic and drug evidence under increased security.
      3. Disposition processes related to narcotics and drug disposition should involve two persons to witness and verify disposition
      4. Evidence should not be marked as destroyed or disposed prior to confirmation and documentation actual destruction or final disposition.
      5. Accurate disposal records indicating the specific item, associated documentation of authorization and approval for disposal, disposal mechanism, dates of disposal, person or entity disposing of the item, and disposition witness information should be maintained permanently by the evidence management unit.
  1. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Best Practices
    1. Narcotics and Drug Evidence Disposal Recommendations
      1. Agencies should consider post submission testing and weighing of narcotics and drug evidence eligible for disposal to ensure the integrity of the evidence management system.
    2. Public Drug Disposal Programs
      1. Participation in programs involving the uncontrolled or anonymous disposal of unidentified narcotics or drug items is not recommended.
      2. Agencies that elect to participate in public drug disposal programs should provide adequate security for disposal sites to prevent unauthorized access.
    3. K9 Training Aid
      1. The disposition of narcotics or drug evidence for use in training for police K9 training is not recommended. Multiple options exist for K9 training that do not involve disposed agency narcotics or drug evidence.
      2. Agencies that elect to use disposed narcotics evidence should establish routine audits of disposed narcotics or drug materials that ensure authorized use and continued custody.
  2. High-Value Evidence Standards
    1. High-Value Evidence Principles
      1. While all evidence should be treated with appropriate measures to ensure a secure chain of custody and preserve the integrity of the evidence item, certain items possess higher storage liability due to financial, historical or political value associated with the evidence item. High-value evidence requires special handling considerations for associated evidence types due to agency integrity implications, replacement cost value, evidentiary value, potential forensic value, and the potential for theft or misappropriation.
      2. Common types of high-value items include jewelry, collectable items, items with a high replacement cost, or items that are considered to possess historical value.
    2. High-Value Evidence Packaging and Labeling
      1. High-value item types and packaging requirements should be defined in the evidence packaging manual.
      2. High-value items should be packaged in a manner that preserves the condition of the item.
    3. High-Value Evidence Submission and Intake
      1. High-value items should be submitted and accepted in compliance with other evidence types, however, items known to possess high-value as defined by agency policy and procedure should provide an indication for storage as a high-value item type.
    4. High-Value Evidence Documentation
      1. Documentation of items believed to possess high-value should not include implied or explicit value descriptors that cannot be substantiated or verified at the time of submission. For example, a gold-colored metal ring with a single clear stone submitted as a jewelry item should not be described as a “diamond gold ring.” Items should be described by appearance, color and shape as opposed to descriptions that unintentionally affix or mistakenly represent item value.
    5. High-Value Evidence Storage
      1. High-value evidence items should be stored in a separate storage area from general evidence storage under increased security.
    6. High-Value Evidence Disposition
      1. High-value evidence eligible, authorized and approved for disposition should be disposed of as established by agency policy and procedure. Auction, sale or return to owner are common methods for high-value evidence disposition.
      2. Agencies electing to destroy high-value evidence items should render the item unusable prior to disposal. Heightened security measures should be enacted and enforced to prevent unauthorized access to disposed items.
      3. Agency policy should prohibit employees from purchasing or bidding on disposed evidence.
      4. High-value evidence eligible for disposition should be stored separately from active narcotic and drug evidence under increased security.
      5. Disposition processes related to high-value evidence disposition should involve two persons to witness and verify disposition
      6. Evidence should not be marked as destroyed or disposed prior to confirmation and documentation actual destruction or final disposition.
      7. Accurate disposal records; indicating the specific item, associated documentation of authorization and approval for disposal, disposal mechanism, dates of disposal, person or entity disposing of the item, and disposition witness information should be maintained permanently by the evidence management unit.
  1. High-Value Evidence Best Practices
    1. No additional practices recommended in this version.
  2. Hazardous Evidence Standards
    1. Hazardous Evidence Principles
      1. Hazardous evidence requires special handling consideration due to specific storage and preservation requirements and potential health or safety risks associated with handling of hazardous evidence.
      2. Common hazardous evidence types include, but are not limited to:
        1. Explosives (ammunition or cartridges, fireworks, flares, blasting caps or detonators, fuses, primers, explosive charges or compositions, etc.)
        2. Gases (flammable gases, toxic gases, or non-toxic, non-flammable gases stored under pressure or possessing asphyxiation potential)
        3. Flammable Liquids (fuels, alcohols, pesticides, solvents and oils)
        4. Flammable Solids (substances inherently flammable, liable to spontaneous combustion or that emit gases when exposed to water)
        5. Oxidizing Substances (substances that yield oxygen or exude heat during decomposition)
        6. Toxic and Infectious Substances (examples: medical or biological waste and cultures, acids, bases, lead, mercury or nicotine compounds)
        7. Radioactive Material (material subject to radioactive decay)
        8. Corrosives (substances that degrade or disintegrate other substances upon contact)
        9. Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods (examples: dry ice, fertilizers, asbestos, lithium ion batteries, lithium batteries, battery powered devices, magnetized materials, air bag modules)
      3. Hazardous Evidence Packaging and Labeling
        1. Hazardous evidence items should be packaged using materials that are appropriate for safely storing the type of hazardous evidence submitted.
        2. Evidence Items containing hazardous materials should be clearly labeled and marked as hazardous evidence with a distinct hazardous material label and symbol.
    2. Hazardous Evidence Submission and Intake
      1. Hazardous material evidence items should be submitted and accepted in compliance with other evidence requirements, however, items known to contain hazardous materials as defined by agency policy and procedure should:
        1. Be submitted for temporary submission storage in an area designed or intended to accommodate hazardous evidence.
        2. Upon acceptance of the hazardous material type, evidence management unit personnel should confirm additional requirements to ensure the safe storage of the item.
    3. Hazardous Evidence Documentation
      1. Items containing hazardous materials should document the hazardous material type or potential hazards associated with them item.
      2. Agencies should provide documented instruction on handling hazardous evidence types.
      3. Agencies should post and retain Material Data Safety Sheets for all hazardous evidence types stored by the evidence management unit.
    4. Hazardous Evidence Storage
      1. Hazardous evidence should be stored under conditions that:
        1. Ensures the safety of personnel handling evidence,
        2. That minimizes risks associated with the type of hazardous materials stored
        3. Prevents damage to the facility or to other evidence stored adjacent to hazardous evidence
        4. Preserves the condition of the evidence item
      2. Hazardous evidence should be separated from general evidence to prevent unintentional damage or reaction to adjacent or chemically incompatible evidence types.
    5. Hazardous Evidence Disposition
      1. Hazardous evidence eligible, authorized and approved for disposition should be destroyed in compliance with state and federal regulations appropriate for the type of hazardous material disposed.
      2. Hazardous evidence eligible for disposition should be stored separately from active evidence under increased security.
      3. Evidence should not be marked as destroyed or disposed prior to confirmation and documentation actual destruction or final disposition.
      4. Accurate disposal records indicating the specific item, associated documentation of authorization and approval for disposal, disposal mechanism, dates of disposal, person or entity disposing of the item, and disposition witness information should be maintained permanently by the evidence management unit.
  1. Hazardous Evidence Best Practices
    1. No additional practices recommended in this version.
  1. Reserved
    1. Reserved for future versions.
      1. Reserved.
  1. Reserved
    1. Reserved for future versions.
      1. Reserved.

 

External References:

National Institute of Standards and Technology. 2013.  The Biological Evidence Preservation Handbook: Best Practices for Evidence Handlers. (NISTIR 7928). Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.


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